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GIOSTAR – Appreciation and Certificate to reviewer for reviewing -“British journal of Medicine and Medical Research .”

 

Dear Dr. Anand Srivastava,

Thank you for your help and support to maintain the high peer review standard of this journal. Kindly find herewith the certificate of reviewing. We again thank you for your great help.

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Dr. Annad SDI Reviewer Certificate

A research team at Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden has managed to create cartilage tissue from stem cells using a 3D printer. The fact that stem cells survived the printing is seen as a major success in itself and could potentially serve as an important step in the quest to 3D-print body parts.

The research, which took three years to complete, was carried out in collaboration with the Chalmers University of Technology, which is recognized for its expertise in 3D-printing biological materials, as well as researchers of orthopedics at Kungsbacka Hospital, a joint statement said.

The research team used cartilage cells taken from humans in connection with knee surgery. Subsequently, the cells were reversed in their development under lab conditions to become so-called pluripotent stem cells, which are cells that have the potential to develop into any kind of cells. Later, they were enclosed in a structure of nanocellulose using a 3D printer. After printing, the cells were treated with growth factors to form cartilage.

The research, which took three years to complete, was carried out in collaboration with the Chalmers University of Technology, which is recognized for its expertise in 3D-printing biological materials, as well as researchers of orthopedics at Kungsbacka Hospital, a joint statement said.

The research team used cartilage cells taken from humans in connection with knee surgery. Subsequently, the cells were reversed in their development under lab conditions to become so-called pluripotent stem cells, which are cells that have the potential to develop into any kind of cells. Later, they were enclosed in a structure of nanocellulose using a 3D printer. After printing, the cells were treated with growth factors to form cartilage.

“The differentiation of stem cells into cartilage works easily in nature, but is significantly more difficult to perform in test tubes. We are the first to succeed in it,” associate professor of cell biology Stina Simonsson said, as quoted by the Swedish newspaper Hällekis Kuriren, venturing that the key to succeeding was tricking the cells into “believing” they were not alone.

Earlier this year, human cartilage cells were successfully implanted in six-week-old baby mice. Once implanted, the tissue began to grow and proliferate inside the animal, eventually vascularizing and growing with blood vessels.

The end product, which was developed using a Cellink 3D bio-printer, was found to be very similar to human cartilage. Experienced surgeons argued that printed cartilage looked “no different” from that found in patients.

On top of being a major technological achievement, the study represents a major step forward for the artificial creation of human tissue. In the not-too-distant future, 3D printers could be used for repairing cartilage damage or as a treatment for osteoarthritis, which causes the degeneration of joints. The latter is a very common condition, affecting one in four Swedes aged 45 and over.

At present, however, the structure of cellulose used in printed cartilage was ruled “not optimal” for the human body and needs to be fine-tuned before actually benefitting patients.

Source : https://goo.gl/JhMFYf

New research demonstrates that vitamin C targets and kills cancer stem cells, the cells responsible for cancer tumors growing and spreading. Researchers at the U.K.’s University of Salford found that vitamin C — ascorbic acid — was up to 10 times more effective in stopping cancer than experimental treatments.

“We have been looking at how to target cancer stem cells with a range of natural substances, but by far the most exciting are the results with vitamin C,” said Dr. Michael P. Lisanti.

Cancer stem-like cells are thought to be resistant to chemotherapy, which leads to treatment failure in patients with advanced disease. Researchers also believe that cancer stem cells (CSC) trigger the recurrence of tumors and fuel their growth. This allows them to spread throughout the body and cause death.

The Salford scientists set out to evaluate the bioenergetics of cancer stem cells — the processes which allow the cells to live and thrive — with the intent of disrupting their metabolism.

They studied the impact of seven substances: the clinically-approved epilepsy drug stiripentol, three natural products — caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), silibinin and ascorbic acid — and experimental pharmaceuticals actinonin, FK866 and 2-DG.

While they found that natural antibiotic actinonin and the compound FK866 were the most potent, the natural products also inhibited the formation of cancer stem cells, with vitamin C outperforming 2-DG 10-fold in terms of potency.

“Controlling cancer stem cells is the only way to control cancer and is a major weapon against metastatic cancer, which is the main killer of cancer patients,” neurosurgeon Dr. Russell Blaylock tells Newsmax Health.

“Conventional chemo and radiation can cure or control only 5 to 10 percent of metastatic cancers,” says Blaylock, author of Dr. Blaylock’s Prescriptions for Natural Health.

“Vitamin C is cheap, natural, non-toxic and readily available,” Lisanti said, “so to have it as a potential weapon in the fight against cancer would be a significant step.”

Lead author Gloria Bonuccelli said, “Our results indicate it is a promising agent for clinical trials, and as an add-on to more conventional therapies, to prevent tumor recurrence, further disease progression and metastasis.”

The effectiveness of vitamin C in fighting cancer has been hotly debated. Laboratory studies found that vitamin C killed cancer cells in the laboratory and also in mice, but similar results haven’t always been supported in human studies.

Experts speculate that contrary to laboratory and mice studies, most human studies have been conducted using oral vitamin C, and most is unused and excreted in urine. “The dose of vitamin C has to be very high,” says Blaylock. Very high doses are usually reached by IV infusion.

Until now, researchers have also believed that vitamin C’s anti-cancer potential is due to its antioxidant capabilities. However, researchers at the University of Iowa also found that vitamin C may actually work by generating free radicals that literally tear cancer cells apart while avoiding healthy cells.

A study published in Science found that vitamin C caused oxidative stress in cancer cells and turned off an enzyme cancer cells use to reproduce.

Vitamin C has also been shown to be effective in other areas of health:

• An analysis of 29 randomized human studies by scientists at Johns Hopkins found that a 500 milligram tablet of vitamin C each day significantly reduced both systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

• A European study of almost 20,000 men and women found that mortality from cardiovascular disease was 60 percent lower in people with the highest concentrations of vitamin C in their blood when compared to those with the lowest concentrations.

• A study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men with the lowest blood levels of vitamin C had a 62 percent higher risk of cancer-related death after a 12 to 16 year period, compared to those with the highest vitamin C levels.

• A Finnish study, which was published in Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, found that vitamin C halved the incidence and duration of the symptoms of bronchoconstriction, which causes symptoms of asthma during exercise. It also increased the post-exercise capacity of the lung’s small airways by 50 to 150 percent in more than 40 percent of asthmatics.

Source : https://goo.gl/WL2KzQ

Dr. Anand Srivastava Meeting With Anupriya Patel Minister of State in the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India About Stem Cell Therapy.

 

 

World-first Transplant to Treat Macular Degeneration Could Augur Rise of iPS Cell Banks

On March 28, a Japanese man in his 60s became the first person to receive cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that had been donated by another person.

The surgery is expected to set the path for more applications of iPS cell technology, which offers the versatility of embryonic stem cells without the latter’s ethical taint. Banks of iPS cells from diverse donors could make stem cell transplants more convenient to perform, while slashing costs.

iPS cells are created by removing mature cells from an individual (from their skin, for example), reprogramming these cells back to an embryonic state, and then coaxing them to become a cell type useful for treating a disease.

In the recent procedure, performed on a man from Hyogo prefecture, skin cells from an anonymous donor were reprogrammed and then turned into a type of retinal cell that was transplanted onto the retina of the patient who suffers from age-related macular degeneration. Doctors hope the cells will stop progression of the disease, which can lead to blindness.

In a procedure performed in September 2014 at the Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, a Japanese woman received retinal cells derived from iPS cells. They were taken from her own skin, though, and then reprogrammed. Such cells prepared for a second patient were found to contain genetic abnormalities and never implanted.

The team decided to redesign the study based on new regulations, and no other participants were recruited to the clinical study. In February 2017, the team reported that the one patient had fared well. The introduced cells remained intact and vision had not declined as would usually be expected with macular degeneration.

In today’s procedure — performed at the same hospital and by the same surgeon Yasuo Kurimoto — doctors used iPS cells that had been taken from a donor’s skin cells, reprogrammed and banked. Japan’s health ministry approved the study, which plans to enroll 5 patients, on 1 February.

Using a donor’s iPS cells does not offer an exact genetic match, raising the prospect of immune rejection. But Shinya Yamanaka, the Nobel Prize-winning stem-cell scientist who pioneered iPS cells, has contended that banked cells should be a close enough match for most applications.

Yamanaka is establishing an iPS cell bank, which depends on matching donors to recipients via three genes that code for human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) — proteins on the cell surface that are involved in triggering immune reactions. His iPS Cell Stock for Regenerative Medicine currently has cell lines from just one donor. But by March 2018, they hope to create 5-10 HLA-characterized iPS cell lines, which should match 30%-50% of Japan’s population.

Use of these ready-made cells has advantages for offering stem cell transplants across an entire population, says Masayo Takahashi, an ophthalmologist at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology who devised the iPS cell protocol deployed in today’s transplant. The cells are available immediately — versus several months’ wait for a patient’s own cells — and are much cheaper. Cells from patients, who tend to be elderly, might have also accumulated genetic defects that could increase the risk of the procedure.

At a press conference after the procedure, Takahashi said the surgery had gone well but that success could not be declared without monitoring the fate of the introduced cells. She plans to make no further announcements about patient progress until all five procedures are finished. “We are at the beginning,” she says.

Source : https://goo.gl/Jyim9B

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