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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is one of the most distressing neurodegenerative disorders, which is typified by gradual deterioration of motor neurons. This happens in the spinal cord, cortex, and the brainstem. As a result of this disorder, patients suffer from respiratory deficiency as well as paralysis, which ultimately prove fatal. Comprehending the causes of ALS makes the treatment of this disorder even more difficult. However, stem cell treatment has surfaced as a promising treatment of late. With ongoing research and development around the world ALS treatment India is also growing at a fast pace. India n hospitals and centers are also involved vigorously in research and development activities to make Stem Cell therapy more accessible.

There is huge potential of Stem Cell therapy in treating cardiovascular, neurological, as well as ocular disorders. Several clinical studies regarding ALS treatment India  are being carried out with stress on autologous stem cells, progenitor and stem cells, and at the same time, researchers are also trying to maintain highest standards and ethical values to match the global standards.

In the recent times cases of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is on the rise, and many other diseases related to lifestyle is also increasing rapidly with rapid increase in the population. Along with ALS treatment India, many other therapies will be launched in the India n market in the next few years. Given that, stem cells comprise of the power to differentiate into a variety of cells, these put forward treatment options for a number of degenerative diseases and disorders. Other than treatment of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Stem Cell therapy is also used in treating other motor neuron ailments such as spinal muscular atrophy, primary lateral sclerosis, progressive bulbar palsy, and progressive muscular atrophy. Motor neuron disorders like ALS reduce quality and span of life drastically, and stem cell transplantation has emerged as an ideal treatment.

Cranial reconstructions will soon be radicalized with the addition of 3D printing and stem cells into the method. A team of scientists from Western Australia will soon attempt this new technique with the intention of seeing the reduction in risk of complications, surgical procedure duration and costs.

The first patients will be those from the Royal Perth Hospital, whose skulls have either been severely damaged or partially removed for brain surgery.

human-skull

The research team, which includes a surgeon, two engineers, a neurosurgeon and chief scientist will collaborate with a Vienna-based 3D printing firm to replicate the bones from the patients’ cranium.

A printed bioceramic scaffold less than 100 microns (0.1mm) of the original bone will be infused with millions of stem cells. This will be fitted onto the patient’s skull.

This is the first time stem cells will be put to use with 3D printed scaffold to assist in bone regrowth, according to neurosurgeon Marc Coughlan.

“What we’re trying to do is take it one step further and have the ceramic resorb and then be only left with the patient’s bone, which would be exactly the same as having the skull back,” he said.

Health minister Kim Hames says,”This project highlights some of the innovative and groundbreaking research that is under way in WA’s public health system, and the commitment of the government to supporting this crucial work.”

The reconstruction project is part of the nine health and medical projects in Western Australia that has been allocated A$2 Million (US$1.5 Million) research funding grant by the state government. The government’s aim is to eventually reduce costs and improve efficiency in Australia’s public health service through the help of these projects.

Previous methods by past studies had the bone part frozen and stored for later replanting. However, attempts to replant often resulted either in infection or bone resorption. The more popular titanium plates, on the other hand, pose the problem of eventual material degradation.

Source : http://goo.gl/TJTLcT

Neurol Res. 2012 Mar;34(2):129-42

Authors: Bednar MM, Perry A

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Neurorestoration within the human central nervous system (CNS) is a concept that is barely a decade old. Despite this, there is significant clinical activity in this area, although there has not been any attempt to systematically identify these trials and organize them by disease area and phase of development. The objective of this investigation is to broadly review the current state of neurorestorative clinical trial activity ongoing worldwide.
METHODS: Iterative searches of the databases clinicaltrials.gov, EU Clinical Trials Register and ADIS Insight were used to locate clinical trials identified as involving neurorecovery/restoration strategies or stem cells for central nervous system diseases.
RESULTS: A wide range of neurorestorative clinical trials (N = 106) are ongoing or planned. Nearly three-fourths of all clinical trials (75/106) are targeting one of four disease areas: multiple sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of 106 ongoing and planned clinical trials focus on cell-based therapy, although these are almost exclusively in phase 1 or 2 of development.
DISCUSSION: Neurorecovery is an emerging field that is currently focused on earlier stages of clinical development, primarily in four disease areas. As the field matures, it is expected that there will be a greater balance of studies across a wider spectrum of CNS diseases as well as in late-stage development.

PMID: 22333068 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 

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